Wednesday, December 4, 2019

Less is more! JS8Call 40M Mesh Network by Julian OH8STN

Hello Operators.
For the last 24 hours, I’ve bewn running an experiment. An experiment where I am only operating at 25 watts output, but doing so with  a directional antenna, and the narrow bandwidth data mode, JS8Call.

The antenna is the Chameleon EMCOMM III Base, configured as a Sloping Inverted Vee. It’s orientation is ~340° and 215°. This should give me some “gain” towards North West, while still allowing EU work.

The ultimate goal is getting the js8 mesh network working, between EU and North America. I’ve tried this for months using 45-75 watts. It wasn’t fail but, I didn’t like the results. Now  the opposite approach is employed. 25 watts with the right antenna configuration, gets me into North America. Running tighter filters, gets North America back to me.Today I received messages from North America, (which is not uncommon). What is an uncommon is having so many North American stations hearing me, and me hearing those same stations. Some of those North American station sending messages, received acknowledgements back from my “low power” station. This went on for hours today.
The only downside to running lower power, was not getting as far into the Midwest as I normally do with my higher power configurations. Even so, from my logs, it appears I have more reliable Communications with more stations in the east and near west of North America. Reliable links means we can use the JS8Call Network, more effectively. This is really huge for the low power off grid station.

I’m going to continue running 25 watts. I’ll also continue publishing updates as often as I can, to validate the results received yesterday and today. So far it looks pretty freaking awesome.

If you want to help me with this experiment you certainly can. Send my station directed short message using JS8Call. You can do that direct, or store your message on another station (between us) which hears me. Also remember, don’t disable the networking features of JS8Call. You can greatly help our testing, by allowing your station to contribute to the networking aspects of JS8, when your station is idle.Finally you can also use the @NORDNET group on JS8Call. I encourage high-latitude stations or others interested in those stations, to use the @NORDNET group on JS8Call.

73
Julian oh8stn

A BEGINNER’S GUIDE TO SNOWSHOEING By Garland Kennedy

Blinded by the wind and stung by the cold, we set up our camp as the day grew dark around us. The two of us had snowshoed to Dogsled Pass, deep in the Talkeetna Mountains of south central Alaska. We hoped to explore nearby alpine valleys over the next two days.
Despite the uncooperative weather, we were not disappointed — to see Alaska in the winter is to see the real Alaska.
Snowshoeing is unlike regular hiking. Everything is heavy, from the extra insulating layers to the snowshoes themselves. Movement is slower, more deliberate. And risks like avalanches and hypothermia have to be considered.
But despite the challenges and risks, snowshoeing opens up an entirely new world for outdoors enthusiasts. Terrain considered impassable during the summer — such as muskegs, bogs, and boulder-fields — becomes traversable when everything is frozen or buried in snow.
snowshoe alaska
The author’s cousin, Esther, rests for a moment near Dogsled Pass. Photo by Garland Kennedy/Coffee or Die.
While walking in snowshoes is an acquired skill, once you get used to wearing clown-sized shoes, walking over even the deepest, most powdery snow feels like gliding.
Imagine a snow hike without post-holing into snow drifts every few steps. And most modern snowshoes, like the MSRs we wore, have spikes on the bottom, so walking on ice becomes trivial. While modern snowshoes may lack the iconic look of vintage snowshoes, the modern ones are lighter, narrower, and stronger.
The area of the wilderness that my cousin, Esther, and I chose to visit last winter is notoriously rough. In 2018, a Russian hiker went missing, presumably dead, only a few miles from where we set our snow camp. The wilderness is always indifferent to people, and winter adds a new dimension to that calculus.
The Hatcher Pass area is an iconic hiking destination in all seasons. From the Independence Mine State Historical Site to the towering granite peaks that dot the region, the Southern Talkeetnas are a magical place. There’s even a crashed TB-29 Superfortress on a nearby glacier.
snowshoe alaska
Finding shelter from the wind behind a boulder. Staying well-fed and hydrated is even more important when it’s below zero. Photo by Garland Kennedy/Coffee or Die.
Our route took us from the Independence Mine over Hatcher Pass (not easy with the full weight of a winter pack!), then north up Craggie Creek. Dogsled Pass, where we camped, separates the headwaters of Craggie and Purches Creeks.
From there we snowshoed the upper rim of Purches Creek to the headwaters of Peters Creek. Here’s a warning: walking in snowshoes is … unique. It forces you to take very wide steps, and doing so repeatedly over so many miles caused me quite a bit of knee pain.
A doctor later informed me that I had managed to pull my patella sideways. It was painful, but not enough to stop me from walking.
The lesson? Ease into snowshoeing. I pushed too hard too fast and got hurt. Build your strength over time, preferably by doing day trips instead of extended expeditions. A day pack weighs little and causes a lot less strain, whereas a pack for a winter overnight trip is quite heavy.
snowshoe alaska
An abandoned mining shack near the headwaters of Craggie Creek. The area experienced a tremendous mining boom in the early 1900s. Photo by Garland Kennedy/Coffee or Die.
And as usual for winter excursions, dress in layers, manage your temperature well, and drink lots of water! Proper hydration aids in temperature regulation. I’m a fan of hydration bladders for hiking, just make sure that the outlet hose does not freeze.
As a general safety rule for winter hiking, carry some sort of emergency beacon device, as well as extra layers.
For a new snowshoer, try to find a flat, scenic trail and keep things moderate. Walking with all that extra weight on your feet takes acclimation. As a rule, avoid snowmachine trails (snowmobile trails, in the lower 48) to make sure you don’t get run over. One of the big perks of wearing snowshoes is that you are not forced to stick to the main trail network.
If done right, snowshoeing is a wonderful experience. To see the world draped in snow is something special and very much worth the added effort.

Band Plan

2200 and 600 - meter bands
General, Advanced and Amateur Extra class licensees are authorized to use these Amateur Bands
Amateurs wishing to operate on either 2,200 or 630 meters must first register with the Utilities Technology Council online at https://utc.org/plc-database-amateur-notification-process/. You need only register once for each band.
135.7 – 137.8 1 W EIRP maximum
472 - 479 KHz:  5 W EIRP maximum, except in Alaska within 496 miles of Russia where the power limit is 1 W EIRP.

160 Meters (1.8-2.0 MHz)

1.800 - 2.000CW
1.800 - 1.810Digital Modes
1.810CW QRP
1.843-2.000SSB, SSTV and other wideband modes
1.910SSB QRP
1.995 - 2.000Experimental
1.999 - 2.000Beacons

80 Meters (3.5-4.0 MHz)

3.590RTTY/Data DX
3.570-3.600RTTY/Data
3.790-3.800DX window
3.845SSTV
3.885AM calling frequency

60 Meters (5 MHz channels)

*Only one signal at a time is permitted on any channel
*Maximum effective radiated output is 100 W PEP
5330.5USB phone1 and CW/RTTY/data2
5346.5USB phone1 and CW/RTTY/data2
5357.0USB phone1 and CW/RTTY/data2
5371.5USB phone1 and CW/RTTY/data2
5403.5USB phone1 and CW/RTTY/data2

 

1. USB is limited to 2.8 kHz
2. CW and digital emissions must be centered 1.5 kHz above the channel frequencies indicated in the above chart

40 Meters (7.0-7.3 MHz)

7.040RTTY/Data DX
7.080-7.125RTTY/Data
7.171SSTV
7.290AM calling frequency

30 Meters (10.1-10.15 MHz)

10.130-10.140RTTY
10.140-10.150Packet

20 Meters (14.0-14.35 MHz)

14.070-14.095RTTY
14.095-14.0995Packet
14.100NCDXF Beacons
14.1005-14.112Packet
14.230SSTV
14.286AM calling frequency

17 Meters (18.068-18.168 MHz)

18.100-18.105RTTY
18.105-18.110Packet

15 Meters (21.0-21.45 MHz)

21.070-21.110RTTY/Data
21.340SSTV

12 Meters (24.89-24.99 MHz)

24.920-24.925RTTY
24.925-24.930Packet

10 Meters (28-29.7 MHz)

28.000-28.070CW
28.070-28.150RTTY
28.150-28.190CW
28.200-28.300Beacons
28.300-29.300Phone
28.680SSTV
29.000-29.200AM
29.300-29.510Satellite Downlinks
29.520-29.590Repeater Inputs
29.600FM Simplex
29.610-29.700Repeater Outputs

6 Meters (50-54 MHz)

50.0-50.1CW, beacons
50.060-50.080beacon subband
50.1-50.3SSB, CW
50.10-50.125DX window
50.125SSB calling
50.3-50.6All modes
50.6-50.8Nonvoice communications
50.62Digital (packet) calling
50.8-51.0Radio remote control (20-kHz channels)
51.0-51.1Pacific DX window
51.12-51.48Repeater inputs (19 channels)
51.12-51.18Digital repeater inputs
51.5-51.6
Simplex (six channels)
51.62-51.98Repeater outputs (19 channels)
51.62-51.68Digital repeater outputs
52.0-52.48Repeater inputs (except as noted; 23 channels)
52.02, 52.04FM simplex
52.2TEST PAIR (input)
52.5-52.98Repeater output (except as noted; 23 channels)
52.525Primary FM simplex
52.54Secondary FM simplex
52.7TEST PAIR (output)
53.0-53.48Repeater inputs (except as noted; 19 channels)
53.0Remote base FM simplex
53.02Simplex
53.1, 53.2, 53.3, 53.4Radio remote control
53.5-53.98Repeater outputs (except as noted; 19 channels)
53.5, 53.6, 53.7, 53.8Radio remote control
53.52, 53.9Simplex

2 Meters (144-148 MHz)

144.00-144.05EME (CW)
144.05-144.10General CW and weak signals
144.10-144.20EME and weak-signal SSB
144.200National calling frequency
144.200-144.275General SSB operation
144.275-144.300Propagation beacons
144.30-144.50New OSCAR subband
144.50-144.60Linear translator inputs
144.60-144.90FM repeater inputs
144.90-145.10Weak signal and FM simplex (145.01,03,05,07,09 are widely used for packet)
145.10-145.20Linear translator outputs
145.20-145.50FM repeater outputs
145.50-145.80Miscellaneous and experimental modes
145.80-146.00OSCAR subband
146.01-146.37Repeater inputs
146.40-146.58Simplex
146.52National Simplex Calling Frequency
146.61-146.97Repeater outputs
147.00-147.39Repeater outputs
147.42-147.57Simplex
147.60-147.99Repeater inputs
Notes: The frequency 146.40 MHz is used in some areas as a repeater input. This band plan has been proposed by the ARRL VHF-UHF Advisory Committee.

1.25 Meters (222-225 MHz)

222.0-222.150Weak-signal modes
222.0-222.025EME
222.05-222.06Propagation beacons
222.1SSB & CW calling frequency
222.10-222.15Weak-signal CW & SSB
222.15-222.25Local coordinator's option; weak signal, ACSB, repeater inputs, control
222.25-223.38FM repeater inputs only
223.40-223.52FM simplex
223.52-223.64Digital, packet
223.64-223.70Links, control
223.71-223.85Local coordinator's option; FM simplex, packet, repeater outputs
223.85-224.98Repeater outputs only
Note: The 222 MHz band plan was adopted by the ARRL Board of Directors in July 1991.

70 Centimeters (420-450 MHz)

420.00-426.00ATV repeater or simplex with 421.25 MHz video carrier control links and experimental
426.00-432.00ATV simplex with 427.250-MHz video carrier frequency
432.00-432.07EME (Earth-Moon-Earth)
432.07-432.10Weak-signal CW
432.1070-cm calling frequency
432.10-432.30Mixed-mode and weak-signal work
432.30-432.40Propagation beacons
432.40-433.00Mixed-mode and weak-signal work
433.00-435.00Auxiliary/repeater links
435.00-438.00Satellite only (internationally)
438.00-444.00ATV repeater input with 439.250-MHz video carrier frequency and repeater links
442.00-445.00Repeater inputs and outputs (local option)
445.00-447.00Shared by auxiliary and control links, repeaters and simplex (local option)
446.00National simplex frequency
447.00-450.00Repeater inputs and outputs (local option)


33 Centimeters (902-928 MHz)

Frequency Range
Mode
Functional Use
Comments
902.000-902.075
FM / otheincludinDV Or CW/SSB
Repeater inputs 25 MHz splipaired with thosi927.000-927.07or Weak signal
12.5 kHz channel spacinNote 2)
902.075-902.100
CW/SSB
Weak signal

902.100                    
CW/SSB
Weak signal calling
Regionaoption
902.100-902.125
CW/SSB
Weak signal

902.125-903.000
FM/otheincludinDV
Repeater inputs 25 MHz splipaired with thosi927.1250-928.0000
12.5 kHz channel spacing
903.000-903.100
CW/SSB
Beaconand weak signal

903.100
CW/SSB
Weak signal calling
Regionaoption
903.100-903.400
CW/SSB
Weak signal

903.400-909.000
Mixed modes
Mixeoperationincluding controlinks

909.000-915.000
Analog/digital
Broadband multimedia including ATV, DATV and SS
Note3) 4)
915.000-921.000
Analog/digital
Broadband multimediincluding ATV, DATV and SS
Note3) 4)
921.000-927.000
Analog/digital
Broadband multimedia including ATV, DATV and SS
Note3) 4)
927.000-927.075
FM / otheincludinDV
Repeater outputs 25 MHz splipaired with thosi902.0000-902.0750
12.5 kHz channel spacing
927.075-927.125
FM / otheincludinDV
Simplex

927.125-928.000
FM / other includinDV
Repeater outputs 25 MHz split paired with thosi902.125-903.000
12.5 kHz channel spacing Note5) 6)

 

Notes:
1) Significant regional variationiboth current banutilizatioand thintensity anfrequency distributioof noise sources preclude onplan that is suitablfor alpartof the country These variations will require many regionafrequency coordinators to maintaibanplans that differ in some respects from annationaplan As with albanplans, locally coordinateplanalways take precedence over any general recommendations such as a national banplan.
2) May busefor either repeater inputs or weak-signaas regionaneeddictate
3) Divisiointo channeland/or separatioof uses within these segments may bdone regionally baseoneedanusage, such as for MHz-widdigitaTV.
4) These segments may also bdesignated regionally to accommodate alternative repeater splits.
5) Simplex FM callinfrequency 927.50or regionally selectealternative.
6) AdditionaFM simplex frequenciemay bdesignated regionally.

23 Centimeters (1240-1300 MHz)

Frequency Range
Suggested Emission Types
 Functional Use
1240.00-1246.000
ATV
ATV Channel #1
1246.000-1248.000
FM, digital
Point-to-point links paired with 1258.000-1260.000
1248.000-1252.000
Digital

1252.000-1258.000
ATV
ATV Channel #2
1258.000-1260.000
FM, digital
Point-to-point links paired with 1246.000-1248.000
1240.000-1260.000
FM ATV
Regional option
1260.000-1270.000
Various
Satellite uplinks, Experimental, Simplex ATV
 1270.000-1276.000
 FM, digital
Repeater inputs, 2kHz channel spacing, paired with 1282.000-1288.000
 1270.000-1274.000
 FM, digital
Repeater inputs, 2kHz channel spacing, paired with 1290.000-1294.000 (Regional option)
1276.000-1282.000
ATV
ATV Channel #3
 1282.000-1288.000
 FM, digital
Repeater outputs, 2kHz channel spacing, paired with 1270.000-1276.000
1288.000-1294.000
Various
Broadband Experimental, Simplex ATV
 1290.000-1294.000
 FM, digital
Repeater outputs, 2kHz channel spacing, paired with 1270.000-1274.000 (Regional option)
1294.000-1295.000
FM
FM simplex

FM
National FM simplex calling frequency 1294.500
1295.000-1297.000

Narrow Band Segment
1295.000-1295.800
Various
Narrow Band Image, Experimental
1295.800-1296.080
CW, SSB, digital
EME
1296.080-1296.200
CW, SSB
Weak Signal

CW, SSB
CW, SSB calling frequency 1296.100
1296.200-1296.400
CW, digital
Beacons
1296.400-1297.000
Various
General Narrow Band
1297.000-1300.000
Digital

NoteThe need to avoid harmful interference to FAA radars may limit amateur use of certain frequencies in the vicinity of the radars.


13 Centimeters (2300-2310 and 2390-2450 MHz)

Frequency Range
Emission
Bandwidth
Functional Use
 2300.000-2303.000
 0.05 - 1.MHz                   
 Analog Digitalincluding full duplex; paired with 2390 - 2393 
2303.000-2303.750
 < 50 kHz
 Analog Digital; paired with 2393 - 2393.750
2303.75-2304.000

 SSB, CW, digital weak-signal
2304.000-2304.100
 3 kHz or less
 Weak SignaEMBand
 2304.10-2304.300
 3 kHz or less
 SSB, CW, digital weak-signal (Note 1)
 2304.300-2304.400
 3 kHz or less
 Beacons
2304.400-2304.750
 6 kHz or less
 SSB, CW, digital weak-signal & NBFM
 2304.750-2305.000
 < 50 kHz
 Analog Digital; paired with 2394.750 - 2395
 2305.000-2310.000
 0.05 - 1.MHz
 Analog Digital, paired with 2395 - 2400 (Not2)
 2310.000-2390.000                                                      NON-AMATEUR
2390.000-2393.000
0.05 - 1.0 MHz
Analog Digitalincluding full duplex; paired with 2300- 2303
 2393.000-2393.750
 < 50 kHz
 Analog Digital; paired with 2303 - 2303.750
 2393.750-2394.750

 Experimental
 2394.750-2395.000
 < 50 kHz
 Analog Digital; paired with 2304.750 - 2305
 2395.000-2400.000
 0.05 - 1.0 MHz
Analog Digitalincluding full duplex; paired with 2305- 2310
2400.000-2410.000
6 kHz or less
Amateur Satellite Communications
2410.000-2450.000
22 MHz max.
BroadbanModes (Notes 3, 4)
Notes:
1: 2304.100 is the National Weak-Signal  Calling Frequency
2 2305 2310 is allocated on a primary basis to Wireless Communications Services (Part 27). Amateuoperationin this segment, which are secondary, may not be possible in all areas.
3 Broadband segment may be used for any combination of high-speed data (e.g802.11 protocols), Amateur Television and other high-bandwidth activities.  Division into channels and/or separation of usewithin this segment may be done regionally based oneedand usage.
4 2424.100 is the Japanese EME transmit frequency
 
Note:
 The following band plans were adopted by the ARRL Board of Directors in 2012.
 

3300-3500 MHz

Level I - Major Band DivisionsLevel II - Sub-Band DivisionsLevel IIISuggestedSuggested 
Frequency Range (MHz)Frequency Range (MHz)Specific Freq.Emission TypesEmission B.W. 
FromToWidthFromToWidthMHz(Note 1)(Note 1)Functional Use
3300.0003309.0009.0    Analog & Digital, including Full Duplex0.1 - 1.0 MHzAnalog & Digital; paired with 3430.0-3439.0; 130 MHz Split
3309.0003310.0001.0      Experimental
3310.0003330.00020.0    Analog & Digital, including Full Duplex>1.0 MHzAnalog & Digital; paired with 3410.0-3430.0; 100 MHz Split
3330.0003332.0002.0      Experimental
3332.0003339.0007.0      RADIO ASTRONOMY PROTECTED BAND (Note 4)
3339.0003345.8006.8    Analog & Digital, including Full Duplex0.1 - 1.0 MHzAnalog & Digital; paired with 3439.0-3445.8; 100 MHz Split
3345.8003352.5006.7      RADIO ASTRONOMY PROTECTED BAND (Note 4)
3352.5003355.0002.5    Analog & Digital, including Full Duplex0.05 - 0.2 MHzAnalog & Digital; paired with 3452.5-3455.0; 100 MHz Split
3355.0003357.0002.0      Experimental
3357.0003360.0003.0    Analog & Digital, including Full Duplex50 kHz or lessAnalog & Digital; paired with 3457.0-3460.0
3360.0003400.00040.0    OFDM, others22 MHz max.Broadband Modes (Note 3)
   3360.0003380.00020.0 ATV Amateur Television of all authorized modulation standards/formats at local option
3400.0003410.00010.0    CW, SSB, NBFM6 kHz or lessAmateur Satellite Communications
   3400.0003400.3000.3 CW, SSB, Digital3 kHz or lessWeak Signal EME Band 
   3400.3003401.0000.7 CW, SSB, Digital3 kHz or lessTerrestrial Weak Signal Band - Future (Note 2)
      3400.100CW, SSB, Digital EME Calling Frequency
3410.0003430.00020.0    Analog & Digital, including Full Duplex>1.0 MHzAnalog & Digital; paired with 3310.0-3330.0; 100 MHz Split
3430.0003439.0009.0    Analog & Digital, including Full Duplex0.1 - 1.0 MHzAnalog & Digital; paired with 3300.0-3309.0; 130 MHz Split
3439.0003445.8006.8    Analog & Digital, including Full Duplex0.1 - 1.0 MHzAnalog & Digital; paired with 3339.0-3345.8; 100 MHz Split
3445.8003452.5006.7      Experimental
3452.5003455.0002.5    Analog & Digital, including Full Duplex0.05 - 0.2 MHzAnalog & Digital; paired with 3352.5-3355.0; 100 MHz Split
3455.0003455.5000.5     100 kHz or lessCrossband linear translator (input or output)
3455.5003457.0001.5    CW, SSB, NBFM, Digital6 kHz or lessTerrestrial Weak Signal Band - Legacy (Note 2)
      3456.100 6 kHz or lessWeak Signal Terrestrial Calling Frequency
   3456.3003457.0000.1 CW, Digital1 kHz or lessPropagation Beacons
3457.0003460.0003.0    Analog & Digital, including Full Duplex50 kHz or lessAnalog & Digital; paired with 3357.0-3360.0; 100 MHz Split
3460.0003500.00040.0    OFDM, others22 MHz max.Broadband Modes (Note 3)
   3460.0003480.00020.0 ATV Amateur Television of all authorized modulation standards/formats at local option
9 cm Band Plan Notes 
Note 1 – Includes all other emission modes authorized in the 9 cm amateur band whose necessary bandwidth does not exceed the suggested bandwidths listed.
Note 2 – Weak Signal Terrestrial legacy users are encouraged to move to 3400.3 to 3401.0 MHz as time and resources permit.
Note 3 – Broadband segments may be used for any combination of high-speed data (e.g. 802.11 protocols), Amateur Television and other high-bandwidth activities.  Division into channels and/or separation of uses within these segments may be done regionally based on need and usage.
 Note 4 – Per ITU RR 5.149 from WRC-07, these band segments are also used for Radio Astronomy.  Amateur use of these frequencies should be first coordinated with the National Science Foundation (esm@nsf.gov).

5 Centimeters (5650.0-5925.0 MHz)
Frequency Range
Emission
Bandwidth
Functional Use
5650.0-5670.0
              
Amateur Satellite; Up-Link Only 
5650.0-5675.0
 0.05 - 1.0 MHz
Experimental
5675.0-5750.0
 >= 1.0 MHz
Analog & Digital; paired with 5850-5925 MHz (Note 2)
5750.0-5756.0
 >= 25 kHz and <1 MHz
Analog & Digital; paired with 5820-5826 MHz
5756.0-5759.0
 <= 50 kHz
Analog & Digital; paired with 5826-5829 MHz
5759.0-5760.0
< 6 kHz
SSB, CW, Digital Weak-Signal
5760.0-5760.1
< 3kHz
EME
5760.1-5760.3
< 6 KHz
SSB, CW, Digital Weak-Signal (Note 1)
5760.3-5760.4
< 3 KHz
Beacons
5760.4-5761.0
< 6 KHz
SSB, CW, Digital Weak-Signal
5761.0-5775.0
<=50 kHz
Experimental
5775.0-5800.0
>=100 kHz
Experimental
5800.0-5820.0

Experimental
 5820.0-5826.0
 >=25 kHz and <1 MHz
Analog Digital; paired with 5750-5756 MHz
5826.0-5829.0
<=50 kHz
Analog & Digital; paired with 5756-5759 MHz
5829.0-5850.0
0.05-1.0 MHz
Experimental
5830.0-5850.0 Amateur Satellite; Down-Link Only
5850.0-5925.0>=1.0 MHzAnalog & Digital; paired with 5675-5750 MHz (Note 2)
Note 1: 5760.1 is the National Weak-Signal Calling Frequency
Note 2: Broadband segment may be used for any combination of high-speed data (eg: 802.11 protocols), Amateur Television and other high-bandwidth activities. Division into channels and/or separation of uses within this segment may be done regionally based on needs and usage.


3 Centimeters (10000.000-10500.000 MHz )

Frequency Range
Emission
Bandwidth
Functional Use
10000.00 - 10050.000 Experimental
10050.000-10100.000<=100 kHzAnalog & Digital; paired with 10300-10350
10100.000-10115.000>=25 kHz and <1 MHzAnalog & Digital; paired with 10350-10365
10115.000-10117.000<=50 kHzAnalog & Digital; paired with 10365-10367
10117.000-10120.000 Experimental
10120.000-10125.000<=50 kHzAnalog & Digital; paired with 10370-10375
10125.000-10200.000>=1 MHzAnalog & Digital; paired with 10375-10450 (Note 2)
10200.000-10300.000 Wideband Gunnplexers
10300.000-10350.000<=100 kHzAnalog & Digital; paired with 10050-10100
10350.000-10365.000>=25 kHz and <1 MHzAnalog & Digital; paired with 10100-10115
10365.000-10367.000<=50 kHzAnalog & Digital; paired with 10115-10117
10367.000-10368.3006 kHz or lessSSB, CW, Digital Weak-Signal & NBFM (Note 1
10368.300-10368.4006 kHz or lessBeacons
10368.400-10370.0006 kHz or lessSSB, CW, Digital Weak-Signal & NBFM
10370.000-10375.000<=50 kHzAnalog & Digital; paired with 10120-10125
10375.000-10450.000>=1 MHzAnalog & Digital; paired with 10125-10200 (Note 2)
10450.000-10500.000 Space, Earth & Telecommand Stations
Note 1: 10368.100 is the National Weak-Signal Calling Frequency
Note 2: Broadband segment may be used for any combination of high-speed data (eg: 802.11 protocols), Amateur Television and other high-bandwidth activities. Division into channels and/or separation of uses within this segment may be done regionally based on needs and usage.

Above 10.50 GHz*

All modes and licensees (except Novices) are authorized Amateur Bands above 10.5 GHz.
* US amateurs must check Sections 97.301, 97.303, 97.305 and 97.307 for sharing requirements before operating.